Easter feasts

 

If you don't want to have to worry about finding time to pop to the local butchers before Easter weekend, we're here to help. All cuts for the recipes below are available to buy in our new online shop!

Pssst....we haven't added a traditional leg of lamb to our website yet but we wanted to offer our customers the option for Easter. 
Call 0203 8697860 to order for delivery.

Dress to impress

LAMB CROWN ROAST 

A crown roast is the ultimate centrepiece - racks of lamb tied into a ring with the ribs proudly pointing skywards to form a fittingly regal showstopper. Often served stuffed or crusted with herbs, a crown roast is a special occasion in its own right.

Recipe: Lamb crown roast

Quick supper

LAMB SHOULDER CHOP


A large cut taken from across the shoulder of lamb, perfect for slow cooking. Cooking on the bone gives great flavour and depth to the sauce, and the meat is so tender it can be cut with a spoon. Because the chop is taken from right across the shoulder, it contains a piece of bone and often a small seam of cartilage, which falls out easily after slow cooking.

Recipe: Lamb, Bay & Lemon Ragu

Comfort food

BEST END/NECK END CHOP


A superb slow-cooking cut, unbeatable for braises, tagines, curries and stews. Large, meaty chops taken from the neck, with a decent coating of fat left on in order to flavour and enrich whatever you're cooking. For a healthy appetite rather than the faint hearted!

Recipe: Lancashire Hotpot

Not keen on lamb?

WING RIB

Our roasting guide for a large (2 or more bone) wing or fore rib joint. If you want to be absolutely sure about how 'done' you roast is, insert a meat thermometer into the centre: it should read approximately 50°C for rare, 54°C for medium rare and 58°C for medium. 

Recipe: Roast Wing Rib

PORK RACK

Pork rack sits between the pork loin and the start of the shoulder and should consist of seven rib bones, the back bone is removed to allow each rib to be cut off easily. The skin should be finely scored – in parallel lines, not big diamonds, which rarely make the best crackling. There should always be a nice layer of fat between the skin and the eye muscle of the meat.